Adidas, Apple and Ribena: The top 10 YouTube ads in February

Brands such as Adidas, Apple and Ribena dominated February’s top 10, with Nintendo also featuring thanks to buzz around the launch of its new Switch home console.

1. Adidas: Unleash your creativity

The latest ad from Adidas focuses on female athletes and the creativity they use to switch up their workout routine. The ad, which was created by 72andSunny, features people hitting the bikes inside a disco and some jogging in torrential rain.

2. Ribena: Introducing new Ribena Minis

Ribena’s new Minis range is targeted at small children, with this upbeat ad from JWT focusing on the bottle’s new cap and its so-called ‘less spill, less mess’ technology. Crisis is adverted when a small child drops his bottle only to somehow avoid any spillage.

3. Sainsbury’s: Food Dancing (Yum Yum Yum)

Sainsbury’s enlists British rapper MysDiggi to create a (slightly cringe) tune that its customers twerk to while cooking food. The ad, which was created by Wieden & Kennedy and ends with a dancing baker in a Sainsbury’s store, is certainly different from the price-focused ads the supermarkets usually prioritise.

4. OnePlus: Who do you love?

This bonkers Valentine’s Day ad from mobile phone brand OnePlus features a bunch of singletons seductively licking its latest handset. After all, who needs a lover when you can just settle for the OnePlus3T, right!?

5. Apple: iPhone 7 + AirPods

Manchester rock band The 1975 provide the soundtrack for this short and sweet ad (created by TBWA and the Media Arts Lab) that shows off Apple’s controversial new wireless AirPods earphones range.

6. Nike & FKA Twigs: Do you believe in more?

7. The Prince’s Trust & L’Oreal Paris: All worth it

8. Nationwide: Jo Bell on building the Building Society

9. Nintendo: Nintendo Switch can play anytime, anywhere, with anyone

10. Kellogg’s Corn Flakes: Desmond’s perfect bowl

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  • Madison Redtfeldt 27 Mar 2017 at 5:34 pm

    The top ten YouTube advertisements are as different and as unique as the products and messages they are attempting to convey to their audiences. The Adidas advertisement focused on creativity and female empowerment. The commercial depicted different women working hard to achieve success in their athletic and physical capabilities. It mentioned that we had been lied to, and then showed very creative ways to workout. Their attempt to illustrate that working out does not have to be static, boring, and usual was successful. Adidas stresses how creativity can be expressed in your workout and how the brand stands for creativity and self-improvement. A mobile phone brand is stirring up the internet with their “who do you love” valentine’s day spoof advertisement. OnePlus created an advertisement illustrating young adults admitting their love and lust for an unknown receiver, which was later revealed to be just their cell phone. Loving their devices more than anything the phones get the users excited and feelings something. This advertisement was based on sex appeal and successfully conveyed the message they attempted to. L’Oréal Paris and the Prince’s Trust advertisement sparked hope for the British youth through the tag line “Because we are all worth it”. The Prince’s Trust and L’Oréal are teaming up to create an online program to inspire self-worth in young professionals and provide them with the tools and training for success. The add mentions that they will provide interview training and much more for the young professionals concerned about entering the workforce after the Brexit of 2016. L’Oréal’s advocacy in this advertisement reflects its brands mission statement that we “are all worth it” and further demonstrates how the brand is committed to its customers.

  • li cheng 28 Mar 2017 at 7:24 am

    Advertising is a marginal fashion, I used to use the word marginal, the reason to say so, just think it will never be a fashion for the public to share. In some Chinese magazines and some well-known sites, often have such a wonderful ad appreciation section. I do not want to say that these advertising works are not, but for the editors of the kitsch style and dissatisfaction. Maybe I should ask them, what kind of advertising is considered a good ad?
    Good advertising for real consumers. Because we communicate a concept for the target audience, a benefit. If we can not meet the most basic communication function, we are wasting the customer’s budget and valuable social resources.
    Good advertising is not just for winning. Winning is the embodiment of the value of the creator, but it is undeniable that the judges are often subject to their inherent value orientation and experience background. The cadres of the advertising department or the members of the advertising association are at a distance from the consumers.
    Good advertising can not be divorced from the local culture and socio-economic soil because advertising in a limited time and space to enrich the communication, it seeks the most direct and most powerful resonance.
    Good advertising will not be used in isolation for a single media, it should be able to extend, not only in the time span but also in the media and communication on the integrated.

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