Better banner ads

Rosie Baker is Marketing Week’s specialist on sustainability and retail.

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Banner ads sometimes get a hard time. There are great examples of clever banner ads, but there are a lot more dull and unimaginative examples, but the one that Opel is running for its Movano commercial vehicles in Europe is a novel idea.

Now, far be it from me to say that midsized commercial vehicle’s aren’t cool, but, it’s tough to create standout in the sector.

Opel’s ad turns the banner into a file transfer service mirroring its van’s purpose on the roads.

Much the same as its vans are useful for transporting heavy goods in the real world, its banner ad can be used to transport up to 2gb files across the internet. As well as receiving the download, both parties also get info about the Movano range.

Why do I like it? Because it’s not just a banner ad. It’s a concept that’s relevant for the product it’s selling. It’s not just flashing “look at me! look at me!” for the sake of clicks. It makes a good point, very well, and it perfectly translates the brand’s physical use, into a digital use.

The brand is giving users some reason to click on it, and use its service. It creates good engagement with what is a pretty low engagement category.

It will also create advocates further down the line. Not everyone that clicks on the banner ad is going to run out and buy an Opel Movano, but the next time they do need a service to move something from one place to another, the Movano will be front of mind.

It was made by McCann Lowe, Belgium.

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