Camelot backtracks on good causes pledge

Camelot has backtracked on its pledge to raise £15bn for good causes over the next seven-year licence, and now says it will only be able to achieve this figure if regulations are changed to give it more freedom to market games.

Camelot has backtracked on its pledge to raise &£15bn for good causes over the next seven-year licence, and now says it will only be able to achieve this figure if regulations are changed to give it more freedom to market games.

The &£15bn pledge – based on sales of &£51bn over seven years – was made after rival bidder for the licence, Sir Richard Branson’s The People’s Lottery, said it would deliver the same sum to good causes. Branson accused Camelot of making up the figure to spike his own announcement.

However, regulator the National Lottery Commission will not hold Camelot to raising the sums it stated in its bid, and Camelot faces no fines if it fails to meet the target.

Camelot has admitted that the &£15bn figure depends on it being allowed greater freedom to market controversial games – such as scratchcards with a top prize of &£1m. But the NLC is sensitive to charges that it is encouraging irresponsible marketing of games, and has so far refused many of Camelot’s requests for such games.

Camelot marketing director Ian Milligan says: “The &£15bn depends on the regulator lightening up a little and getting these things to market in a controlled manner.”

He has also called for broadcast regulations to be loosened to allow closer tie-ups between lottery games and TV shows.

Recommended

Digest

Marketing Week

Consignia, the newly-created corporate identity for the Post Office, has chosen Rufus Leonard as the key agency to develop its brand online. Consignia will be officially introduced to the public on March 26, accompanying a move to plc status. The new name – a fusion of “consign” and “signature” – is meant to position the […]

Digest

Marketing Week

Italian clothing retailer Benetton is to roll out a new billboard and press campaign in over 100 countries from mid-February, which will show everyday people sporting its gear. The new campaign, to promote its spring-summer 2001 collection, will be a departure from its provocative ads which led to the departure of creative director Olivieri Toscani […]

Sunday shopping

Marketing Week

Sunday shopping is not just a chance to catch up with regular household purchases, it is a social and leisure activity. But despite attempts by some multiples to enforce longer opening hours, Sunday shoppers seem content with the status quo.

Comments

    Leave a comment

    Close

    Discover even more as a subscriber

    This article is available for subscribers only.

    Sign up now for your access-all-areas pass.

    Subscribers get unlimited access to unrivalled coverage of the biggest issues in marketing and world-renowned columnists, alongside carefully curated reports and briefings from Econsultancy. Find out more.

    If you are an existing print subscriber find out how you can get access here.

    Subscribe now

    Got a question?

    Contact us on +44 (0)20 7292 3703 or email customerservices@marketingweek.com

    If you are looking for our Jobs site, please click here

    Subscribers get unlimited access to unrivalled coverage of the biggest issues in marketing and world-renowned columnists, alongside carefully curated reports and briefings from Econsultancy. Find out more.

    If you are an existing print subscriber find out how you can get access here.

    Subscribe now