Eco-watchdogs savage Johnson

Green groups condemn SC Johnson’s ‘sewer-blocking, polluting’ disposable toilet-cleaning product

Environmental watchdogs have heavily criticised a forthcoming toilet-cleaning product, developed by SC Johnson, for using potentially hazardous flushable cleaning pads.

The product, to be launched this summer under the Toilet Duck brand, is said to be similar to a brand in the US called Scrubbing Bubbles. It comprises individual pads impregnated with cleaning ingredients, which can be thrown away, after a single use, into the toilet.

But the launch has run into fierce criticism from the members of the Bag It and Bin It environmental coalition, run by the UK Centre for Economic and Environmental Development, which aims to discourage people from throwing waste down their toilets.

AÂspokeswomenÂforÂthe Women’s Environmental Network, a founding member of Bag It and Bin It, says there are concerns that the wipes could end up blocking the sewage system or polluting seas and beaches.

She adds: “We’re very concerned about the rise in toilet disposals, particularly products such as this that are just used once and then thrown away.”

The range is to be supported by a multi-million pound ad campaign devised by Banks Hoggins O’Shea/ FCB, with media duties handled by Zenith Optimedia.

Reckitt Benckiser is planning a rival product under its Harpic brand, called Ready Brush, a plastic toilet brush with a canister that ejects cleaning foam on to the head. The launch will be supported by a £2m TV campaign created by J Walter Thompson, with media handled by All Response Media.

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