Eurostar introduces new logo

Eurostar has introduced a new logo as part of an overhaul of its product and service offering that is aimed at making the travel operator the continent’s “most loved travel experience”.

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The new visual identity drops the three lines that represented the three countries that Eurostar previously operated in – England, France and Belgium – in favour of a lower case e with a single line passing through. The company’s name has also switched from lower to upper case.

The company says the move is designed to represent the new commercial freedom provided by a change to European law last year that allowed train operators to run services anywhere in the European Union.

The company plans to partner with other operators to offer products and propositions in countries such as Germany and Holland.

Later this year, Eurostar will also add flexible ticketing – allowing business travellers to travel anytime on the day the ticket is bought – to its Business Premier service. It will also offer a mobile product that allows business customers to buy and enter a platform without a ticket.

Its leisure offer, Standard Premier, will be expanded through more partnerships with cultural and leisure attractions in more countries.

The company will also look to sign more celebrity advisers with a soon to be announced celebrity chef to advise travellers on dining out. Musician Jarvis Cocker already offers advice on culture.

Nick Mercer, commercial director at Eurostar, says that he wants to compete with train operators and short-haul airlines.

“We want to make Europe’s most loved travel experience. Why can’t you make travel and the experience of travelling in Europe and enjoyable thing and differentiate it from airlines and train operators.”

Emma Harris, sales and marketing director adds the new logo also provides the Eurostar brand consistency across all markets.

“From a brand perspective, we have previously developed very different identities in each of our core markets, however, as we compete in a deregulated market and expand our reach across Europe, it’s vital that we have a consistent brand in all markets.”

The new logo will be phased in from 5 April.

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