Facebook emulates Twitter with status tagging

Facebook has added a tagging function to status updates in its latest bid to compete with rival social network Twitter.

The new tool uses an ‘@’ tagging function, similar to that used on Twitter. It will allow Facebook users to link to friends, groups, pages or events when updating their status.

When updating a status, entering an @ symbol before typing the word brings up a drop-down box where users can select what they want to add a link to.

Once tagged, users will receive a notification and a wall post linking them to the original post, which gives them the option to remove themselves from the tag.

Facebook said on its blog, “One of the most popular features on Facebook is tagging, which gives you the ability to identify and reference people in photos, videos and notes. Today, we are adding a new way to tag people and other things you’re connected to on Facebook – in status updates and other posts from the publisher. It’s another way to let people know who and what you’re talking about.”

In March Facebook added real-time updates, its first move to compete with rival real-time network Twitter (nma.co.uk, 5 March 2009).

To visit the NMA website click here

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