Gadgets go all girly as last bastion of manhood ends

It was always an unwritten law: men do football and gadgets, women do clothes shops and make-up.

It was always an unwritten law/ men do football and gadgets, women do clothes shops and make-up. On Saturday afternoons, Gadget Shop would be full of men trying to get Magic Eye puzzles to work, while women were happily shopping away in the clothes shop next door, safe in the knowledge that their easily pleased other halves would be enthusiastically staring at a fuzzy mess for half an hour because they thought they would eventually be able to see a Viking longboat.

However, Future, the publisher of gadget magazine T3, has noticed that the worm has turned, and launched technology and lifestyle weblog aimed at women called GadgetCandy.com.

GadgetCandy’s senior writer – who’s so feminine she’s got two girls’ names combined into one – Jessamy Hawley says: “Girls today are proud of their gadget wardrobe”, while T3 editor James Beechinor-Collins flounders in his attempts to come up with a memorable soundbite by claiming that “women are swapping memory sticks for lipstick”.

Beechinor-Collins adds: “Men and women want different things from their gadgets.” Hasn’t Ann Summers already got this covered?

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