ISBA begins search for DG as Earnshaw stands down

Malcolm Earnshaw, the director-general of the Incorporated Society of British Advertisers, is stepping down after six years at the helm. The organisation, which represents the interests of Britain’s biggest advertisers, has already begun the s

Malcolm Earnshaw, the director-general of the Incorporated Society of British Advertisers, is stepping down after six years at the helm. The organisation, which represents the interests of Britain’s biggest advertisers, has already begun the search for his replacement.

He has agreed to stay in the post for up to nine months, while a suitable successor is found.

ISBA has appointed a three-man committee to draw up a shortlist of candidates, which will then be put forward to the ISBA Council. This committee consists of Chris Searle of Bacardi-Martini; Raoul Pinnell, chairman of Shell Brands International; and Phil Smith, commercial and operations director of Camelot Group.

Some names which are already being suggested as potential candidates include Douglas MacArthur, founder of the Radio Advertising Bureau (now the Radio Centre); former Toyota GB commercial director Mike Moran; Martin Runnacles, former global marketing director of Jaguar and currently director of Presky Maves; former NatWest and Inland Revenue marketing director Ian Schoolar; Ian Twinn, ISBA’s director of public affairs; and ISBA director of media and advertising Bob Wooton, who was runner-up when Earnshaw was appointed.

One ISBA insider says that the ideal candidate would be “someone who has played a significant role within ISBA or who can demonstrate similar commitment and relevant experience.” The insider adds that whoever is appointed will have to have considerable diplomatic skills.

ISBA and the marketing services industry face a number of tough challenges, relating to marketing to children, food and health marketing and EU proposals to further regulate TV broadcasting. Earnshaw says: “I have thoroughly enjoyed – and continue to enjoy – my role at ISBA, but, having completed the agreed six-year term of office and reached the age of 60, it is time to move on. I will remain fully committed to the role until a suitable successor is found and appointed. Until then it’s business as usual for me, and for ISBA.”

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