Marketing chief Orpen leaves to launch consultancy

Shaun Orpen, Microsoft’s outgoing director of corporate marketing, is to become an IT consultant from September.

Orpen says he will try consulting for six months but his long term goal is to become the managing director of a smallto medium-sized IT-related company.

He says he has had discussions with companies over new marketing jobs but has not found anything that meets his needs. Orpen has worked for Microsoft for over 13 years but in May announced his plans to leave at the end of this month. He will begin his new career after spending August with his family.

Orpen wants to teach companies how to make money from websites and show how they can enhance their public image, such as by working with charities.

He will continue to work as a member of the corporate development board of the NSPCC. Orpen was instrumental in arranging Microsoft’s sponsorship of the NSPCC’s controversial Full Stop campaign.

He says: “I will focus my efforts on working with companies that specialise in the area where the software, Internet and telecoms sectors converge.”

Orpen’s work at Microsoft will be folded into Oliver Roll’s new remit as marketing director for the UK (MW June 21).

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