McDonald’s to launch “eco uniforms”

McDonald’s staff will wear recycled uniforms designed by British designer Wayne Hemmingway from next year.

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The fast-food chain says that the collaboration is part of its long-term sustainability strategy.

McDonald’s is also working with Worn Again, which specialises in “upcycling” clothing and materials to make new products.

Worn Again will help McDonald’s introduce a “closed loop” uniform system that will see McDonald’s collect old uniforms, reprocess them into raw materials and make them into new uniforms.

McDonald’s claims to be the first UK company to develop a closed loop uniform.

The new uniform design will be unveiled and worn first at McDonald’s Olympic Park restaurants – as part of its sponsorship of the Games.

It will then roll out to all 1,200 McDonald’s restaurants and 85,000 staff across the UK.

Wayne and Geraldine Hemmingway are British designers who launched the Red or Dead brand.

Jez Langhorn, vice president of people at McDonald’s UK, says:

“Our staff share Worn Again’s commitment to sustainability and I hope that together we can create a uniform design model for the future which others can follow.”

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