Men Behaving Badly star to launch own brand of beer

Actor Neil Morrissey is launching his own brand of beer as part of a new Channel 4 series. The show will see him set up a microbrewery as he searches for the perfect pint.

The actor is working with friend Richard Fox and advertising and brand agency Antidote to launch the brand. It is understood the agency has been approached to develop the branding and positioning of the beer but has also been offered a stake in the brewery.

The three-part series, called Neil Morrissey’s Perfect Pint, has been commissioned by Jamie Oliver’s production company Fresh One and talkbackThames.

The series will follow the Men Behaving Badly star and Fox searching for the perfect pint of beer at a variety of festivals before moving on to a home brew kit. The pair then decide to buy a microbrewery and make the beer on a commercial scale.

Morrissey says: “Beer should not be just for men with sparrows in their beard or lager louts. I want to create the everyman’s ale.”

It is understood that Morrissey and Fox are forming a company that will launch three beers later this year.

It is understood they are talking to Sainsbury’s about gaining listings.

Antidote was founded by former Bates executive creative director Tim Ashton in 2003, and the pair are not thought to have decided on the brand name, although it is thought that Morrissey and Fox are considering using their own names.

The show is due to be aired this summer with filming taking place now.

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