Microsoft’s new app store offers better revenue share than rivals

Microsoft has unveiled Windows Store, the new app market for its smartphone and tablet operating systems, which will give developers of popular applications a better revenue share than its rivals Apple and Google.

/y/p/y/windowsstore160.jpg

Like its competitors, Microsoft will take 30% from an app’s purchases until it reaches sales of $25,000 (£15,994), at which point the revenue split will change to an 80-20 split.

The company hopes the move will encourage more brands and developers to create popular paid-for apps on its platform, rather than its rivals.

Antoine Leblond, vice President of Windows web services, says: “There’s perhaps no more material expression of our commitment to the economic viability of Windows developers than the amount of money the Store will generate for developers…We intend to offer the industry’s best terms, so that the best apps make developers a lot more money on Windows than on any other platform.”

Windows Store will be powered by Bing search to make it easier for users to find their desired apps. Lack of easy navigation is a complaint often raised by users about Android’s Market.

The Store will also feature free previews, allow users to make in-app purchases and offer developers choice about the ad format that works best for them, a model currently not available on Apple’s platform.

Apps purchased via the Store, which will be available from February, will be seamlessly integrated between Windows PCs and Windows 8 tablets.

Launch app partners include eBay, Disney and The Daily Telegraph.

Yesterday (6 December) Google’s Android marked its 10 billionth app download, while Apple announced that it had reached 15 billion app downloads in July.

engageawardsweb

Have you delivered an innovative and effective digital strategy this year? Then enter the digital category in the Marketing Week Engage Awards 2012 by clicking here.

Recommended

/q/b/g/qanda.jpg

Q&A: Lego

Laura Snoad

David Buxbaum, Lego UK’s senior director of marketing, talks to Laura Snoad about how the iconic toy brand is using nostalgia, popular culture and digital innovation to build appeal among the young and old.

Comments

    Leave a comment

    Close

    Discover even more as a subscriber

    This article is available for subscribers only.

    Sign up now for your access-all-areas pass.

    If you're an existing paid print subscriber find out how to get access here.

    Subscribers enjoy unlimited access to unrivalled coverage of the biggest issues in marketing, alongside practical advice from the digital experts at Econsultancy.

    With a subscription to Marketing Week Premium you will get full access to:

    > World-renowned columnists

    > Analysis & case studies

    > Exclusive leading-edge insight

    > Carefully curated reports & briefings from Econsultancy

    > Plus, much more including a £300 discount for the Festival of Marketing

    Subscribe now

    Got a question?

    Contact us on +44 (0)20 7292 3703 or email customerservices@marketingweek.com

    If you are looking for our Jobs site, please click here

    Subscribers enjoy unlimited access to unrivalled coverage of the biggest issues in marketing, alongside practical advice from the digital experts at Econsultancy.

    With a subscription to Marketing Week Premium you will get full access to:

    > World-renowned columnists

    > Analysis & case studies

    > Exclusive leading-edge insight

    > Carefully curated reports & briefings from Econsultancy

    > Plus, much more including a £300 discount for the Festival of Marketing

    Subscribe now