Over 60% of Twitter users stop visiting the site after a month

Over 60% of users of microblogging service Twitter stop using the site after a month, according to research figures from Nielsen Online.

The US figures show that despite Twitter growing exponentially in the last year – an increase of over 100% year-on-year in the US in March – the rate of retention is just 40%.

The site, made popular by celebrities such as Stephen Fry, Jonathan Ross and Ashton Kutcher has also attracted brands, hoping to cash in on the rapidly growing audience on the site.

Nielsen figures show that sites such as Facebook and MySpace, which have seen similar explosive growth rates had retention rates nearly twice as high as Twitter. Both MySpace and Facebooks’ retention rates sit at nearly 70% today, according to Nielsen Online.

David Martin, vice president of primary research at Nielsen Online, said, “Twitter has grown exponentially in the past few months with no small thanks to celebrity exposure.

“People are signing up in droves, and Twitter’s unique audience is up over 100% in March. But despite the hockey-stick growth chart, Twitter faces an uphill battle in making sure these flocks of new users are enticed to return to the nest.”

This story first appeared on newmediaage.co.uk

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