Psion names first CMO

Psion, the mobile computer company, has appointed Nick Eades to the newly created position of chief marketing officer with immediate effect.

Eades was previously vice president, marketing of Toronto-headquartered Nortel, the telecommunications technology company, where he covered the Europe, Middle East and Africa Regio.

He has previously worked for BT, Fujitsu Siemens Computers, Dell and IBM.

Psion chief executive John Conoley was appointed last summer to take up the responsibilities previously handled by Jacky Lecuirbe and has been evaluating the company’s marketing and branding requirements.

He says: “We have created a CMO role in order to fully exploit our existing strong product portfolio as well as to ensure that the product pipeline is managed with customers firmly in mind.

“Nick will help me execute our key goal of making our products and services to customers channel-friendly and expand our distribution in a cost-effective way. His appointment is a further sign of our commitment to market-driven innovative products and services and partnership in sales.”

Psion is a Canadian company but its headquarters are in London. It’s most well-known product is the Psion organiser.

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