Radio industry needs to be bold, says Miron

Radio Reborn: The radio industry needs to be imaginative and more creative so it can continue to engage with listeners and advertisers as it enters a digital world, according to senior radio executives.

Speaking at the Radio Reborn conference in London today (April 27), executives from both the BBC and commercial radio talked of how the industry needs to work together to offer compelling content and choice.

Stephen Miron (pictured), chief executive of Global Radio and former managing director of the Mail on Sunday, says the commercial radio industry needs to “pull together” and not be afraid to point out of the virtues of the medium to advertisers.

He adds that radio advertising needs to be more “creative”, pointing out that no UK agency has ever won the Cannes Lion radio award, and that more “imaginative” when developing partnership opportunities with brands.

Meanwhile, Tim Davie, the BBC’s director of audio and music and former PepsiCo and Procter & Gamble marketer, says radio needs to address “fundamental” risks or it is likely to see declining interest from listeners.

Davie says the BBC and the commercial radio industry need to work together to “battle in a fully on-demand audio world”.

He says that the industry needs “to set its creative sights higher” to ensure that radio is not restricted in the digital age to draw “new listeners into what we do”.

Davie adds that the two also need to work together to ensure “radio is at the heart of digital Britain. Earlier today, Davie and chief executive of the RadioCentre Andrew Harrison announced a partnership called The Radio Council http://www.marketingweek.co.uk/cgi-bin/item.cgi?id=65201&d=254&h=5&f=3
to this end. Plans include a common online industry player and a common user interface across all digital platforms.

On digital radio, Miron says he would like the next draft of the Government’s Digital Britain plans for radio to be “bolder” and to name a date for the switchover from analogue.

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