Specsavers strings up Olympic officials

Specsavers has lampooned Olympics staff who mixed up the North and South Korean flags in one of the Games’ opening football matches earlier this week in its latest press ad.

Specsavers Olympic ad

The ad depicts the two separate flags and its strapline “Should have gone to Specsavers”, partly in Korean.

It features across several national newspapers today (27 July), just two days after the North Korean women’s football team walked off the pitch after the South Korean flag was mistakenly displayed ahead of their match at Hampden Park.

IOC president Jacques Rogge said there was “no political connotation” over the mix up and insisted it was a “simple human mistake”.

Specsavers’ opportunistic spot today follows another press campaign in June that mocked a linesman’s failure to determine the ball had crossed the goal line during England’s 1-0 win over Ukraine at Euro 2012.

Again, the one-off spot used the long-running strapline “Should have gone to Specsavers”, this time partly written in Ukrainian.

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