The latest connected technology from Samsung, Sony and Nike

Samsung connected devices

Samsung is at the forefront of connected devices ensuring that content on its smartphones, TVs, cameras, laptops and tablets can be shared and accessed between devices via an app. Samsung’s connected TVs are WiFi-enabled allowing people to use apps such as Facebook and BBC iPlayer via the TV. Later this year, the brand will launch Smart Control, an app that links to washing machines over a WiFi network so the consumer can select cycles, start cycles and check progress remotely.

Sony SmartWatch

Last April, Sony launched SmartWatch, a wristwatch with a touchscreen that allows users to swipe through apps to read emails, texts and social media updates. It also controls music playback via bluetooth technology that connects to Android handsets.

Nike+ Fuel Band

Nike launched Fuel Band last year, enabling users to measure performance and goals with others. The band measures motion and translates it into NikeFuel, a score for activity. Each day the user can set a fuel goal level and as this is reached the band’s series of 20 LED lights go from red to green. The band’s data syncs with the Nike+ website, through a built-in USB or wirelessly through Bluetooth, to a free iPhone app to record activity each day and track progress.

Nest

The WiFi-enabled thermostat allows the owner to control the temperature via a mobile app. The product also registers when the user turns the temperature up or down to create a preference schedule in order to program itself.

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