Twitter poaches YouTube sales chief Bruce Daisley

Twitter has poached Google’s YouTube chief Bruce Daisley to become its first UK sales director as it continues to bolster its operations in the region.

Twitter

Daisley will be responsible for increasing the amount of UK brands that advertise on Twitter and exploring additional revenue streams for the site.

Twitter rolled out its first UK ad suite, dubbed Promoted Products, in September, with Sky becoming the first brand to pay to advertise on the social network in the region.

Daisley will report into UK general manager Tony Wang, who became the first Twitter employee to relocate from the US to London in May.

The social networking site is also looking for a sales marketing manager and business development executives to join the London team.

Daisley has worked at Google since 2008, responsible for leading the UK sales team for YouTube and Google’s online display advertising division.

Prior to Google, Daisley headed up Emap’s advertising team for almost four years.

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