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  1. Haoyang Wang 4 Nov 2015

    This seems like a convenient change. It become more simple for a new user to show how they feel. With a ‘heart’ button, one could express many positive emotions without replying. Such as congratulation, agreement, love, surprise, etc. I believe brands will try to collect as much ‘like’ as possible for marketing. In a popular social media Sina Weibo from China, there is also a heart button named ‘zan,’ which means good in English. Users could find the weibos they liked before in their profile. This is very convenient to mark something interesting.

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