Unilever launches first brand campaign to back sustainability initiative

Unilever is running its first consumer-facing brand campaign with the launch of Project Sunlight, an initiative aimed at motivating people to live more sustainable lifestyles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YUmZNJUAHk

Launching today (20 November) in five markets including the UK, the campaign revolves around a film, created by Ogilvy London and David Latin America, that aims to inspire people to see the future in a more positive light. The project is informed by new research commissioned by Unilever that shows children are key to motivating adults to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle.

There is also an online hub that showcases stories behind Unilever’s brands, such as Lifebuoy soap that boosts hand cleanliness in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Unilever will also be sharing content on YouTube, Facebook and Twitter, inviting people to join the conversation and share ways in which they are changing their behaviour under the hashtag #brightfuture, as well as launching a print campaign.

Speaking to Marketing Week, Unilever’s senior vice president of marketing, Marc Mathieu, said the campaign chose to use the Unilever brand, rather than its product brands, as it aims to build brand trust and establish a mark for sustainable living. The name also looks back to Unilever’s roots, with William Lever founding the company with its first brand, Sunlight soap, focused on making basic health and cleanliness commonplace, he added.

“This is about having a broader ambition and purpose for the company. We want to establish an umbrella platform that shows all Unilever brands that have contributed to making the world better,” he said.

Unilever is working with Save the Children, UNICEF and the World Food Programme on the initiative. As part of the launch, it will create 2 million “acts of sunshine”, providing children with school meals; clean, safe drinking water and improved hygiene.

Rival FMCG giant Procter & Gamble updated on the progress of its sustainability initiatives earlier this week. 

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