Why exclusivity makes the brand

Tesco and Asda et al believe their consumers have the right to buy premium branded clothing at seriously discounted prices, and brand owners naturally disagree.

Much of the recent comment in the business press champions the consumer’s cause and therefore that of the multiples.

Perhaps I’m missing something here but isn’t it the very fact that these items are perceived to be “exclusive” and not generally available that has made them so desired by the mass market.

If anyone and everyone starts buying Adidas and Levi’s at discounted prices from their local supermarkets, surely the original core market will disappear, and won’t that in turn remove the perceived exclusivity of the merchandise, so that it eventually loses its appeal for the mass market too?

The only outcome here would be the demise of the brand – and how can that be of benefit to the consumer – or the brand owner?

Jane Herbert

Pilot Communications

Bagshot

Surrey

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