Sun on Sunday launches first TV ad

The Sun on Sunday is launching a prime time TV campaign tonight (21 February) during ITV’s coverage of the Brit Awards to promote the first edition of the paper, which hits newsstands this weekend.

The Sunday Sun

A series of five-second blip ads will run during the ad breaks of the programme, hosted by James Corden and featuring acts such as Blur, Jessie J and Noel Gallagher, which airs from 8pm on ITV1.

Today (21 February) The Sun also ran an eight-page Brit Awards special in the newspaper.

News International is planning a major above-the-line marketing assault for the title later in the week, which is being launched seven months after its former Sunday tabloid the News of the World was closed down following a phone hacking scandal.

The Sun itself has not escaped the furore and has had ten current and former journalists arrested over allegations of corruption, conspiracy and aiding and abetting misconduct in public office.

The Sunday edition of The Sun is expected to launch with a cover price between 50-70p according to media agency insiders.

News International has confirmed that Fabulous, the former News of the World female-focused supplement, will be part of the Sunday Sun package.

Several big advertisers, which had previously fled the News of the World before its closure in July not wanting to be associated with the phone hacking scandal, will also appear in this Sunday’s edition.

The launch of The Sun on Sunday this week is expected to spark a price war with News International’s rival red top Sunday publishers, which will be looking to retain the readers it gained after the closure of the News of the World.

Above the line marketing campaigns and other promotions are also expected later this week from Trinity Mirror, Express Newspapers and Associated Newspapers.

Read Mark Ritson’s view on the launch of the Sun on Sunday here.

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